Lia Ditton, 36, has more than 150,000 nautical miles of experience – the equivalent of 8 laps of the globe – and has competed at a high level in some of the world’s most challenging ocean races.

Lia Ditton is a professional sailor and writer, passionate about sharing her extraordinary experiences at sea by translating them into contemporary art installations.

The only woman to complete the OSTAR 2005 single-handed transatlantic race, the experience formed the basis of Lia’s 2006 installation, Absolute Solitude: One Woman, One Boat in which Lia lived on her boat next to the Tate Britain Gallery for 28 days – the same number of days as it took her to sail to America.

A licensed captain, Lia has since come 2nd in the Route du Rhum, France’s most-prestigious, single-handed transatlantic race; captained the boat from the film Waterworld starring Kevin Costner; become the 53rd woman to row the Atlantic and the 64th woman to row any ocean, and project managed the largest solar-powered boat in the world.

Lia’s book, 50 Water Adventures To Do Before You Die! was commissioned by Bloomsbury to inspire others and is now available in both English and German.

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Of course the fog eventually cleared yesterday, but by then the tide had turned and the wind was pumping and I was up the backside of Angel Island 🌴! #yorowtraining #microadventure #pacificsolo2018 #guinnessworldrecord #sanfranciscobayarea ...

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Of course the fog eventually cleared yesterday, but by then the tide had turned and the wind was pumping and I was up the backside of Angel Island 🌴! #yorowtraining #microadventure #pacificsolo2018 #guinnessworldrecord #sanfranciscobayarea ...

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Plan A: Sausalito to SF. "You should make it today," said the instructor looking out across the water from the Sausalito Rowing Club. I remember this amused me. Half an hour later and fog begins to creep down the hillsides. After an upwind effort to get closer to the Marin headland, the north foot of the Golden Gate comes into view. "If I can just get to the gate," I thought, "It doesn't matter if the wind pushes me into the bay. I can use it to set towards the St. Francis YC." Then the fog smothers me and the wind proceeding the fog starts to deflect my course towards Angel Island. When the Sausalito ferry comes towards me and 10 seconds later disappears into cotton wool, I think, "OK! Plan B: I'll row round Angel Island!" Off I rocket along the south side of Angel Island. Up the east side should have been with wind and with tide, but is with wind and against tide; across Raccoon Strait is with tide and against wind and up Richardson Bay is against wind and against tide and frankly I am barely treading water. Uh-oh. Plan C: beat a retreat to the SFYC. I reach the breakwater and see Etchel sailing dinghies piled up at every available dock space. Plan D: call the CYC. The Corinthian YC were wonderfully Corinthian and said come right in! 7hrs of non-stop, mostly upwind rowing later and I am dying to stop rowing. Because that's the thing when you row (or kayak) upwind or against the tide - you can't stop, to eat, to pee, to do anything or you lose your heading and the boat goes side on to the wind. Rowing an ocean is predominantly downwind. Thank goodness. But it's great to be out there making memories, which are hopefully harder than the real thing. Hopefully 😉 #yorowtraining #bestjobintheworld #microadventure #sanfranciscobay #oceanrowing #pacificsolo2018 #guinnessworldrecord ...

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